Amazing Facts about the Tsunami

Tsunamis can be very dangerous but let’s take a look at this amazing facts about It.

Do you know?

Tsunami is also known as a seismic sea wave.

Tsunamis cause damage by two mechanisms: the smashing force of a wall of water travelling at high speed, and the destructive power of a large volume of water draining off the land and carrying a large amount of debris with it.

Earthquakes, volcanic eruptions and other underwater explosions (including detonations, landslides, glacier calvings, meteorite impacts and other disturbances) above or below water all have the potential to generate a tsunami.

About 80% of tsunamis occur in the Pacific Ocean, but they are possible wherever there are large bodies of water, including lakes. They are caused by earthquakes, landslides, volcanic explosions, glacier calvings, and bolides.

In World War II, the New Zealand Military Forces initiated Project Seal, which attempted to create small tsunamis with explosives in the area of today’s Shakespear Regional Park; the attempt failed.

Tsunami aren’t generated by the gravitational pull of the Moon and the Sun but is generated by the displacement of water.

Some geologists claim that large landslides from volcanic islands, e.g. Cumbre Vieja on La Palma in the Canary Islands, may be able to generate megatsunamis that can cross oceans, but this is disputed by many others.

Tsunami waves do not resemble normal undersea currents or sea waves because their wavelength is far longer.

Tsunamis and tides both produce waves of water that move inland, but in the case of a tsunami, the inland movement of water may be much greater,

Japan may have the longest recorded history of tsunamis, the sheer destruction caused by the 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunami event mark it as the most devastating of its kind in modern times, killing around 230,000 people.

The 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was among the deadliest natural disasters in human history, with at least 230,000 people killed or missing in 14 countries bordering the Indian Ocean.

The highest wave ever recorded had a height of 524 metres (over 1700 feet). The wave did not travel far, as it struck land almost immediately. Two people fishing in the bay were killed, but another boat managed to ride the wave.

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