Diabetes

Symptoms
Frequent urination, increased thirst, increased hunger

Complications
Diabetic ketoacidosis, nonketotic hyperosmolar coma, heart disease, stroke, chronic kidney failure, foot ulcers

Risk factors
Type 1: Family history

Type 2: Obesity, lack of exercise, genetics.

Diagnostic method
High blood sugar

Treatment
Healthy diet, physical exercise

Medication
Insulin, anti-diabetic medication like metformin

Frequency
425 million (8.8%)

Deaths
3.2–5.0 million per year

Diabetes mellitus (DM), commonly known as diabetes, is a group of metabolic disorders characterized by high blood sugar levels over a prolonged period.

Symptoms of high blood sugar include frequent urination, increased thirst, and increased hunger. If left untreated, diabetes can cause many complications. Acute complications can include diabetic ketoacidosis, hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state, or death.

Serious long-term complications include cardiovascular disease, stroke, chronic kidney disease, foot ulcers, and damage to the eyes.

Diabetes is due to either the pancreas not producing enough insulin, or the cells of the body not responding properly to the insulin produced. There are three main types of diabetes mellitus:

Type 1 DM results from the pancreas’s failure to produce enough insulin due to loss of beta cells. This form was previously referred to as “insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus” (IDDM) or “juvenile diabetes”. The cause is unknown.

Type 2 DM begins with insulin resistance, a condition in which cells fail to respond to insulin properly. As the disease progresses, a lack of insulin may also develop. This form was previously referred to as “non insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus” (NIDDM) or “adult-onset diabetes”.

The most common cause is a combination of excessive body weight and insufficient exercise.

Gestational diabetes is the third main form, and occurs when pregnant women without a previous history of diabetes develop high blood sugar levels.

Prevention and treatment involve maintaining a healthy diet, regular physical exercise, a normal body weight, and avoiding use of tobacco.

Control of blood pressure and maintaining proper foot care are important for people with the disease.

Type 1 DM must be managed with insulin injections.

Type 2 DM may be treated with medications with or without insulin. Insulin and some oral medications can cause low blood sugar. Weight loss surgery in those with obesity is sometimes an effective measure in those with type 2 DM.

Gestational diabetes usually resolves after the birth of the baby.

As of 2017, an estimated 425 million people had diabetes worldwide, with type 2 DM making up about 90% of the cases.

This represents 8.8% of the adult population, with equal rates in both women and men. Trend suggests that rates will continue to rise. Diabetes at least doubles a person’s risk of early death.

In 2017, diabetes resulted in approximately 3.2 to 5.0 million deaths. The global economic cost of diabetes related health expenditure in 2017 was estimated at US$727 billion. In the United States, diabetes cost nearly US$245 billion in 2012.

One thought

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