Pearl onion

The pearl onion (Allium ampeloprasumvar. sectivum or A. ampeloprasum ‘Pearl-Onion Group’), also known as button or baby onions in the UK or creamers in these a close relative of the week (A. ampeloprasum var. porrum), and may be distinguished from common onion by having only a single storage leaf ,similar to cloves of garlic. In French they are known as petit poireau Antilles

Cultivation and storage

Pearl onions are cultivated mostly in Germany, the Netherlands, and Italy usually in home gardens,although formerly on a commercial scale. They are mostly used for pickling.

The majority of onions grown for pickling are common onion (A. cepa). They are grown to a small size suitable for pickling by planting at a high density.

Known small white varieties include Crystal Wax,or White Bermuda.Red varieties are milder in flavour Pearl onions are ready to harvest from seed in 90 days. They can be stored for up to a month in a cool, dry, dark place.

Pickled pearl onions.

Because of its uniquely small size and a taste sweeter than that of a common onion,it has also been used in dishes ranging from mid-20th-century American casserole dishes such as succotash to sweetly flavored onion relishes in Indian cuisine. It can also be used in stews soups or sautéed (fried) with other vegetables. It can also be used in cocktail such as “martini standing”.

Pearl onions are a staple to the cuisine of Northern Europe,especially sweden.

Also in modern Europe they are used as a beautiful flowering plant and in Israel as a cut flower.

Pearl onions contain chemical compounds that have health benefit including helping cardiovascular health and stabilize blood sugar levels .

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