Tag Archives: Fish

How to make Fish cakes

These fish cakes are a doddle to make and you can make them from frozen fish and leftover mashed potato.

Preparation time

1-2 hours

Cooking time

10 to 30 mins

Serves

Makes 8-12 cakes

Ingredients

  • 450g/1lb potato, chopped into chunks
  • 450g/1lb mixed frozen fish such as cod, haddock, salmon, smoked haddock
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 free-range egg, beaten
  • vegetable oil, for frying
  • salt and freshly ground black pepper.

Method

  • Preheat the oven to 190C/170C Fan/Gas 5.
  • For the mashed potato, bring a pot of salted water to the boil. Add the potatoes to the pot and cook until tender, this should take about 15 minutes. When cooked drain in a colander and leave to drain for a few minutes. Return to the pot and mash with a potato masher until a smooth consistency is achieved. Set aside.
  • Put the frozen fish on a roasting tin and cook in the oven for about 10-15 minutes until opaque and starting to flake. When cool enough to handle, remove the skin and any bones and flake the fish into large chunks.
  • Mix the fish, mashed potato, parsley and egg together until well combined. (Mix together carefully so as not to break up the fish too much.) Season with salt and pepper. Shape the mixture into 8-12 patties, depending on how large you want them to be and set aside to chill in the fridge for one hour.
  • Heat vegetable oil in a frying pan and fry the fish cakes until golden brown on each side and heated right through. Serve with tartare sauce and a simple salad

Sharks 🦈

Sharks are a group of elasmobranch fish characterized by a cartilaginous skeleton, five to seven gill slits on the sides of the head, and pectoral fins that are not fused to the head.

Sharks Scientific Classification

Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Chordata
Class: Chondrichthyes
Subclass: Elasmobranchii
Infraclass: Euselachii
Superorder: Selachimorpha

Shark Teeth

Shark teeth are embedded in the gums rather than directly affixed to the jaw, and are constantly replaced throughout life. Multiple rows of replacement teeth grow in a groove on the inside of the jaw and steadily move forward in comparison to a conveyor belt; some sharks lose 30,000 or more teeth in their lifetime. The rate of tooth replacement varies from once every 8 to 10 days to several months. In most species, teeth are replaced one at a time as opposed to the simultaneous replacement of an entire row, which is observed in the cookiecutter shark.Tooth shape depends on the shark’s diet: those that feed on mollusks and crustaceans have dense and flattened teeth used for crushing, those that feed on fish have needle-like teeth for gripping, and those that feed on larger prey such as mammals have pointed lower teeth for gripping and triangular upper teeth with serrated edges for cutting. The teeth of plankton-feeders such as the basking shark are small and non-functional

The Skeleton of a Shark

Shark skeletons are very different from those of bony fish and terrestrial vertebrates. Sharks and other cartilaginous fish (skates and rays) have skeletons made of cartilage and connective tissue. Cartilage is flexible and durable, yet is about half the normal density of bone. This reduces the skeleton’s weight, saving energy.[
Because sharks do not have rib cages, they can easily be crushed under their own weight on land.It is estimated that 100 million sharks are killed by people every year, due to commercial and recreational fishing.Shark finning yields are estimated at 1.44 million metric tons for 2000, and 1.41 million tons for 2010. Based on an analysis of average shark weights, this translates into a total annual mortality estimate of about 100 million sharks in 2000, and about 97 million sharks in 2010, with a total range of possible values between 63 and 273 million sharks per year.Sharks are a common seafood in many places, including Japan and Australia. In the Australian state of Victoria, shark is the most commonly used fish in fish and chips,[citation needed] in which fillets are battered and deep-fried or crumbed and grilled. In fish and chip shops, shark is called flake.

Source Credit: Wikipedia